What iZayUhhh Likes

My name is Isaiah Mendez and I'm 18.BN LyfeStile '08 Mindset

©

Blacked out for a sec and puked a bunch last night. Now I’m hungover.
But when I stumbled into my room and laid to rest my lil bro through something at me. I was like, “What is this!?” He was like “A fruit-by-the-foot” “thank you Sooo much”

Story of my Life

What happened to your knuckles

That fucking hurts

My mom just told me she feels like she failed as a single mom raising me and my older brother.

We Were Promised Jetpacks Quiet Little Voices

groupsuicide:

The more aware I am of how unchilled I’m feeling the harder it is to chill

toxicbreedsfunhouse:

Full Of Hell // The Dial Collective
I love new alstyle. Fits so nicely. Please excuse Tonios mirror
And nothing’s changed. Ahahaha
rhamphotheca:

STORIES I CANT STOP POSTING ABOUT:
If A Fish Grows Up On Land, Will It Learn To Walk?
Flipping your fins actually does get you pretty far.
by Lauren Grush
The old idiom about “being a fish out of water” just lost some of its luster. Researchers from McGill University in Canada successfully trained a group of fish to live on land and strut around.
The idea was to simulate what might have happened 400 million years ago, when the first group of ancient fish moved from water to land, eventually evolving into the amphibians, reptiles, birds and other animals roaming the Earth today. The researchers wanted to see if their land-dwelling fish looked and behaved similarly to the ancient fish, based on what has been learned about them from fossil records.
For their experiment, the research team raised 111 juvenile Polypterus senegalus – African fish also known as the “dinosaur eel” — on land. These fish already look a lot like the ancient fish that evolved millions of years ago, and they’re already capable of “walking” with their fins and breathing air.  According to the Verge, their terrestrial environment had mesh flooring covered in pebbles, as well as 3 millimeters of water, so the fish didn’t dry out completely…
(read more/ watch video: Popular Science)
photo: NATURE